Coastal Erosion

A beach is defined as an accumulation of sediment–usually sand or gravel–that occupies a portion of the coast.

BLUE ECONOMY IS A TERM IN ECONOMICS RELATING TO THE EXPLOITATION, PRESERVATION AND REGENERATION OF THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT. ITS SCOPE OF INTERPRETATION VARIES AMONG ORGANIZATIONS.

Beach Erosion

Unfortunately for beach lovers and owners of high-priced beach-front homes, coastal erosion in any form is usually a one-way trip. Man-made techniques such as beach nourishment—whereby sand is dredged from off-shore sources and deposited along otherwise vanishing beaches—may slow the process, but nothing short of global cooling or some other major geomorphic change will stop it altogether.

According to Stephen Leatherman(“Dr. Beach”) of the National Healthy Beaches Campaign, beach erosion is defined by the actual removal of sand from a beach to deeper water offshore or alongshore into inlets, tidal shoals and bays.

LEAVING POLITICS AT THE DOOR.

“Did climate change contribute to the rapid erosion of beaches?”

The impact of climate change caused by humans that we witness today on our planet Earth is unparalleled.

13 million tonnes of plastic leak into the ocean each year. Environmental Awareness, admonishment of the damage being done to the ocean, preserves the natural world from “plasticize’s” anthropogenic (caused by humans) afflictions (micro & macro debris & nano–sized plastic particles!), can make an important impact on our behalf and advance its issues, not at all, to respond by curtailing the physical environment’s activity(s).

The decline of estuarine and coastal ecosystems (ECEs) worldwide is affecting vital ecosystem services, including hydrological implications resulting from rapid global warming.

“Toxic Substances Control Act”

In Earth science, a Biogeochemical cycle or substance turnover is a pathway by which a chemical substance moves through both the biotic (biosphere) and abiotic (lithosphere, atmosphere, and hydrosphere) components of Earth. The term biogeochemical tells us about the biological, geological, and chemical actors.

Urea pollution is one such actor that turns tides toxic.

The use of urea can cause environmental harm in various ways. Ammonia released from urea applied to agricultural fields can cause acid rain, while nitrates produced in the soil can lead to contamination of groundwater through leaching. Additionally, the denitrification process releases nitrous oxide, contributing to ozone depletion.

The Value and Importance of marine, coastal cultural ecosystem services of the brackish water of estuarine currents and coastal ecosystem services, be they public health, animal and aquatic life, and recreation ensures Ecosystem Science over Ongoing Civil Penalties for Pollution.

Streamflow pollution is caused by estuary cleanup, fracking waste, runoff from construction sites, toxic ash, and deforestation, all of which contribute to biogeochemical cycles.

Storm water volume and runoff rates are directly related to the impervious surface area in a watershed. Land development and urbanization typically increase surfaces that are impervious. During construction an increase in runoff can often be attributed to compaction by heavy equipment.

Storm Water Runoff and Its Impact

Environmentalism evokes huge uncertainty in responding to Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and other materials by demonizing the destruction of hazardous waste containment “toxic waste dumps.”

Climate Change Indicators: Streamflow

Long–term changes in the Earth’s climate system have been significant and are occurring more rapidly than in the past.

Climate change has resulted in increased coastal erosion, flooding, and rapid salinization of groundwater – issues contributing to further global warming.

Continued emissions into the earth’s atmosphere are projected to cause further warming and increase the likelihood of severe, pervasive, and irreversible effects on every continent.

In addition, climate change has a disproportionately stronger impact on the lives and livelihoods of those societies that depend on the natural environment for their day–to–day needs.

The science reported by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is IRREFUTABLE.

AWAVENA is a collaboration between a community and an artist, melding technology and transcendent experience so that a vision can be shared, and a story told of a people ascending from the edge of extinction.

Living and nonliving elements within a particular area interact with each other.

One of the most commonly used natural resources, besides air and water, is what I’m referring to.

Humankind benefits in a multitude of ways from ecosystems. Protecting ecosystems is crucial for maintaining a healthy planet.

Collectively, these benefits open a portal to ecosystem services.

The global decline in ECEs ( Estuarine and Coastal Ecosystems) is affecting several critical benefits or ecosystem services i.e. Hydrological implications of rapid global warming. Environmental Awareness, admonishment of the damage being done to the ocean, and preserving the natural world from “plasticized’s” anthropogenic ( caused by humans ) afflictions ( micro & macro debris & nano–sized plastic particles! ) can make an important impact on our behalf and advance its issues, not at all, to respond by curtailing the physical environment’s activity(s).

Environmentalism evokes huge uncertainty in responding to VOCs ( Volatile Organic Compounds ) and other materials by demonizing the destruction of hazardous waste containment “toxic waste dumps.”

Ecosystem services are regularly involved in the provisioning of clean drinking water and the decomposition of wastes. Consulting services in the fields of bioengineering, water quality, and habitat restoration utilize terms such as biotechnical erosion control & biostabilization – often used synonymously with bioengineering. Soft Engineering” is a new GREEN approach to shoreline stabilization.

These VE (value engineering) technologies are used to prevent surface erosion and accelerate the establishment of vegetation.

Nowhere is that more evident than in planting native wetland plants and grasses, shrubs, and trees at various points along the tidal water line. Uprooting vegetation from coastal areas destabilizes beaches and clear–cutting sites inland resulting in increased soil and dirt particles being washed offshore thereby smothering coral reef systems.

Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS) serves the need for A Common Language For Marine Ecosystems and Coastal Ecologists. Coastal geomorphologists look at climate change and its effects, such as temperature and sea–level rise (predicted by the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) playing a role in accelerated coastal erosion.

Geographical Outlook:

Global warming, a phenomenon driven primarily by human activities, poses one of the most significant challenges to the planet and its inhabitants in the 21st century.

Over the past year, the world hit the key global warming benchmark.

Climate experts have said the world should try to strive to keep the Earth’s average global surface temperature warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius to prevent extreme and irreversible impacts of climate change.

Climate scientists refer to the long-term increase in Earth’s average surface temperature due to the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. As global temperatures continue to rise, the consequences of global warming become increasingly evident, affecting ecosystems, weather patterns, sea levels, and human societies worldwide. This article explores the []

Russia is losing increasing amounts of its Arctic coast each year as climate change accelerates natural erosion processes, a phenomenon that could catalyze new ecological disasters, scientists have warned.

“The Geological Aspect of Shore Processes”

New legislation in Maryland specifies “living shoreline” as the preferred type of erosion control as they place great importance on the health of dunes and beaches.

Waterfront Property Owners are trying to protect their property from rampant erosion by utilizing armoring structures.

Typically these armoring structures, groins, and other structures are erected when coastside sea rise threatens the beachfront.

Accelerated shoreline changes, sea–level rise (SLR), and land loss have resulted in vanishing coasts, increased coastal hazards related to climate change (both natural and man–made disasters), spillway remediation projects, flooding, and rapid salinization of groundwater.

Coastal morphodynamics applications to remediate coastal restoration include environmental containment, landfills, hazardous waste containment, mining, agriculture, & erosion control.

Geomicrobiology has shifted, either from a pattern of accretion to one of erosion.

“Living Shorelines or Naturebased Global Infrastructure”

Although anti-erosion measures are effective in preventing shoreline erosion, they can negatively impact fish populations.

However, the use of living shorelines may be a more sustainable solution that benefits both the environment and aquatic life.


Eco–Engineering Techniques:

  1. Coastal geoscientist
  2. Fixing systems
  3. Marl or marlstone
  4. Researchers Measure…
  5. Reuse and Desalination
  6. River & Coastal Management
  7. Shoreline protection
  8. Water recycling practices.
  9. Wetlands6

The creation of an Ocean Beach comprehensive Master Plan of restoration and maintenance of beaches will maintain the current surface and in some cases will increase the coastal foreshores: coastal geomorphology (Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science).

Erosion prevention should match the type of coastal erosion and lakeshore environment, to the natural and constructed channels, and culverts controlled by outside forces.

In the wake of disappearing (eroding) beaches in coastal areas, and complaints about Clear–Cutting, Land–Clearing near the main water supply areas, Living Shorelines is a creative and proven approach to protecting tidal shorelines from erosion.

Seacoast littoral transport may be defined as sediment movement along the coastal region by currents primarily induced by waves and tides.

Shoreline Renourishment – also referred to as sand replenishment – describes a process by which sediment (usually sand) lost through longshore drift is replaced from sources outside of the coastal ecosystems.

Beach grass communities often create dunes that mitigate coastal erosion and flooding risks stemming from coastside sea rise caused by climate change.

“Beach Alliance – Studying Coastal Ecosystems”

Clean Water Action mandated in–part via the “Clean Streams Law” enlists, preserves, and engenders the purity and value of the muddied waters of the surrounding estuarine.

In Earth science, a Biogeochemical cycle or substance turnover is a pathway by which a chemical substance moves through both the biotic (biosphere) and abiotic (lithosphere, atmosphere, and hydrosphere) components of Earth. The term biogeochemical tells us about the biological, geological, and chemical actors.

Urea pollution is one such actor that turns tides toxic.

This activity serves to prompt an Environmental Compliance Audit, a key component of the coastal challenges of environmental management – the pollution that reaches all of our resources: land, air, and water.

The Value and Importance of marine, coastal cultural ecosystem services of the brackish water of estuarine currents and coastal ecosystem services, be they public health, animal and aquatic life, and recreation ensures Ecosystem Science over Ongoing Civil Penalties for Pollution.

“But beaches are a lot more transient than they appear.”

 SOME BEACHES ONLY TEND TO SHRINK, WHILE OTHERS GROW.

“A Scotland–wide analysis of coastal erosion risk was undertaken by researchers at the university that included identifying more than 10 coastal sites that will soon shrink dramatically through the impacts of sea–level rise, strong wave action, and coastal flooding.” 

The active beach, the area of loose sediment subject to transport by wind, waves, and currents caused by wave action and storm surge, is divided into three regions: the backshore, the foreshore, and the offshore, as shown here.

The constant pounding of waves, especially during storms, plus the scouring action of currents, constantly wash the sand away from some stretches of coastline and deposit it somewhere else.

Beach sands and river channel deposits are examples of fluvial transport and deposition, though sediment also often settles out of slow–moving or standing water in lakes and oceans.

“Tidal scour” is sea–floor erosion caused by strong tidal currents resulting in the removal of inshore sediments and the formation of deep holes and channels.

The soft but cohesive sediment surface, generally mud, is sculptured and reshaped by the scouring action of currents, and constantly washes sand away from some stretches of coastline.

Tidal scour marks are produced as a result of erosion of a sediment surface by the current flowing over the materials and are subsequently transported by the action of wind (aeolian processes), water (fluvial processes), or ice, or by the force of gravity acting on the particles.

“Coastal Cliffs.”

Coastal cliffs can become unstable due to various factors. This article discusses these factors and provides solutions on how to stabilize the cliffs.

Coastal hardening may be insufficient at holding back future seas–at risk of coastal inundation.

Issues such as the restoration of beaches and preparation for catastrophic events need to be dealt with by coastal communities, prompting county governments to take action on repairing infrastructure.

An escarpment is a geological feature that is characterized by a long, steep slope or cliff. It is formed due to faulting or erosion and separates two areas of land that have different elevations 123. The term “escarpment” is derived from the French word “escarpe” which means “scarp” and the Italian word “scarpa” which means “slope” 1.

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I hope this helps!

This scouring action of currents constantly washes the sand into coastal ecosystems.

Dredging could be more harmful to the Great Barrier Reef than previously thought, a government–commissioned report has found, amid fresh warnings over the impact of coastal industrialization on sea turtles and dugongs, World Wildlife Fund (WWF) claims.

The study showed that attempts to combine pollution management with coral bleaching were widespread across this section of reefs. These reefs also appeared to have been damaged by tropical cyclone Penny.

Biodiversity is important to identify precursory signals (e.g., coastal morphodynamics, changes in sea surface temperature resulting in coastal erosion, soil moisture, and remediation of contaminated soil and water) as they are associated with carbon capture and storage (CCS) (or carbon capture and sequestration) and ocean acidification.

Research of Coastal Erosion and Coastal Erosion Zone Management has determined global sea–level rise, the loss of sand and plant habitats, earthquakes, floods, and sudden shifts in river courses exacerbate many of these geohazards.

“Coastal Construction”

Sea level rise is a relatively new contamination issue.

Removing sand and other materials from beaches and dunes due to tidal storm surges and construction purposes causes massive beach erosion damages and land loss of seashores, thus destroying the natural heritage of the coast and reducing the vibrancy of the tourism industry.

Beach mining & sand poachers are symptomatic of an environmental disaster.

These roadmaps provide a medium for the legal requirement for sand harvesting.

These guidelines affect all designated sand sites in the country affected by rising sea levels.

Now the environmental watchdog, Environment Management Agency (EMA), has issued a list of guidelines to harvesters and traders countrywide.

Local authorities should draw up environmental management plans (EMPs) as a way to curb damage to the flora and fauna that were put at risk by the illegal activities of sand poachers and the promotion of recreation in a constructed wetland (CW).

Environmental management plans (EMPs) provide a wide variety of options for treating municipal or industrial wastewater, greywater, or stormwater runoff. It may also be designed for land reclamation after mining, or as a mitigation step for natural areas lost to land development.

“Emergency Sand”

Most beachgoers don’t stop to wonder, though, slim to none, whether the sand will be there when they arrive.

Pumping sand onto the coastline helps maintain wide beaches for tourism and property protection, but some scientists say pumping sand also damages a fragile and often overlooked ecosystem for fish and birds.

”Beach Scraping” is the transfer of sand from the lower beach to the upper beach (within the beach system), usually by mechanical equipment, to redistribute the sand to parts of the beach above tidal level and protect damaged dunes.

Almost a fifth of Scotland’s coastline is at risk of erosion, threatening property and infrastructure worth £400m, scientists say.

What is Bombogenesis?

Bombogenesis is important to identify precursory signals (e.g., changes in sea surface temperature resulting in coastal erosion, soil moisture, and snow cover) associated with carbon capture and storage.

Bombogenesis is a term used by meteorologists to describe a mid-latitude cyclone that rapidly intensifies over 24 hours. This intensification is represented by a drop in millibars, a measurement of pressure used in meteorology. The intensification required to classify as “bombogenesis” varies by latitude. At 60 degrees latitude, it is a drop of at least 24 millibars (24 hectopascals) over 24 hours. At the latitude of New York City, the required pressure drop is about 17.8 millibars (17.8 hectopascals) over 24 hours 1.

What’s a ‘Bomb Cyclone’?

Bomb cyclones tend to happen more in the winter months and can carry hurricane–force winds and cause coastal flooding and heavy snow.

When a cold air mass collides with a warm air mass, especially over warm ocean waters, it can trigger a phenomenon referred to as bombogenesis. Also called explosive cyclogenesis, this can lead to severe weather conditions such as heavy snow, strong winds, and coastal flooding.

Oxygen is essential for many life forms.

Oxygen is essential for many life forms. But we don’t often give it the attention it deserves because we assume that it is always there.

While oxygen is ubiquitous in our atmosphere, it is not necessarily the case for many bodies of water like rivers, lakes, or even oceans.

Here a lack of oxygen can result in significant impacts on the ecosystem as found in Sweden.

Yes, that’s correct. Oxygen is essential for many life forms. It is used in the process of respiration to produce energy. Would you like me to look up more information on this topic?

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